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Sweet Pepper Seeds - Roberto Caribbean

$3.95

Expected to be back in stock by early March

Capsicum baccatum

A classic "flavor" pepper, often thrown whole into dishes to impart their flavor. Sweet with the gentlest hint of spicy heat and big pepper flavor.  Approx. seeds per packet = 60  Packet weight 0.5 grams 

SMALL FARM GROWN by Sundog Savory Cuisine and Gardens, Saluda, NC

Planting Information

 

Seeds per Packet Average packet weight 
 
Seeds / gram 
 
Average seeds / oz
 
70
 
0.5 gram 
 
150
 
4,200
 
Planting SeasonIdeal Soil TempSunFrost Tolerance
After Last Frost65-85°FFull SunFrost Sensitive
Sowing MethodSeed DepthDirect Seed SpacingDays to Harvest 
Transplant1/4"NA70
Mature SpacingDays to SproutProduction CycleSeed Viability
18-24"8-25Annual3-5 years

Site Selection

Peppers are frost-sensitive annuals that require full sun and evenly moist soil to thrive.

Cultivation

Sow pepper seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before the last frost date. Plant seed 1/4-1/2" deep in 3-4" pots. Optimal soil temperature for germination is 65-85°F and seeds will not germinate below 55°F. Seeds will sprout in 8-25 days.

Transplant outdoors 2-3 weeks after the last frost, when the soil has warmed. Black plastic or row covers can help speed up soil warming and plant growth. Mature plants should be spaced 18-24" apart in rows 2 -3' apart. Pepper plants tend to be self-supportive, but taller varieties and those with large, heavy fruit may need to be staked.

 

Harvest

Peppers will be ready to harvest in approximately 65-75 days, depending on the variety. Harvest peppers either when green or when fully ripe and colored.

 

Seed Saving Information

Seed Saving

All pepper varieties are self-pollinating annuals, but insects do visit the flowers, so allow at least 100 feet between varieties. More would be better if you are concerned with variety preservation. For best seed quality and longevity, allow the fruits you are saving for seed to mature and dry as much as possible on the plant itself. When the pepper is nice and dry, you can simply cut it open and shake out the seeds. Alternatively you can put not yet dry (but still mature!) peppers in a blender with at least twice as much water and blend on low for a minute or two. Allow the mixture to sit and the pepper chaff and immature seeds will float to the top to be easily poured off. Spread clean seeds on a screen or several sheets of newspaper to dry completely before storing. Always use caution when handling the seeds of hot peppers.