Monthly Garden Schedule by Zone

June Garden Chores for All USDA Grow Zones

June Garden Chores for All USDA Grow Zones

Planting by USDA Zone is a good starting point to get a handle on what you should be thinking of planting and when. If you pair this overview of gardening tasks by zone with experience, local knowledge and good year on year note taking then you will be well on your way to a successful and confident gardener in no time! 

ZONE 4

  • Cover Brassica crops with floating row cover to protect from cabbage moth and flea beetle damage if these little critters have been a problem in the past.
  • Have a trellis system in place for your tomato patch before the plants begin to sprawl.
  • Colorado potato beetle adults, eggs and larvae can be hand picked to remove or sprayed with an organic insecticide, spinosid if infestation is bad. Adults are yellow and black striped beetles. The eggs are yellow and laid in groups on the undersides of leaves. The larvae are humpbacked and red. Look for them on the stem tips. They are present almost all season.
  • Also keep an eye out for Striped and spotted cucumber beetles transmit a bacterial wilt to squashes and melons. Adults and eggs can be hand-picked throughout the season.
  • Watch for Mexican bean beetle. To be on the safe side you can cover the entire crop with floating row cover as soon as seedlings emerge.
  • Aphids of all types show up on a range of host plants as soon as the warm weather arrives. Look for them in newly unfurling foliage and sticky leaves are also a sign of their presence since they secrete a ‘honeydew’. Black sooty bold may also in this sticky substance and while alarming looking does little to no damage since it does not penetrate the leaves. Aphids, however, do damage the plant. Spray leaves with a strong jet of water to dislodge most of them. Insecticidal soap is a organic approved product that provides pretty good control as long as the insects are wetted well. A second and third treatment to kill newly hatched eggs may be needed in 5-7 days.
  • Squash vine borer adults are 1 inch long, orange and green day-flying moths that are emerging from the soil now. They lay brown, button-shaped, 1/16 inch eggs at the base of the vines of summer and winter squashes. Examine stems daily and remove eggs by hand to prevent burrowing of larvae as they hatch. Wrap lower 6 –12 inches of stem with aluminum foil or floating row cover to prevent egg laying.
  • Once the soil has warmed, put a 2 –4 inch layer of organic mulch on vegetable beds, flower beds and around trees and shrubs.

ZONE 5

  • In a sunny location with poor soil, plant nasturtiums for a colorful show. They require warm soil to sprout and start blooming in about 50 days. Too much water and fertilizer produces excess leaves and few flowers.
  • Cover Brassica crops with floating row cover to protect from cabbage moth and flea beetle damage if these little critters have been a problem in the past.
  • Colorado potato beetle adults, eggs and larvae can be hand-picked to remove or sprayed with an organic insecticide, spinosid if infestation is bad. Adults are yellow and black striped beetles. The eggs are yellow and laid in groups on the undersides of leaves. The larvae are humpbacked and red. Look for them on the stem tips. They are present almost all season.
  • Also keep an eye out for Striped and spotted cucumber beetles transmit a bacterial wilt to squashes and melons. Adults and eggs can be hand-picked throughout the season.
  • Watch for Mexican bean beetle. To be on the safe side you can cover the entire crop with floating row cover as soon as seedlings emerge.
  • Aphids of all types show up on a range of host plants as soon as the warm weather arrives. Look for them in newly unfurling foliage and sticky leaves are also a sign of their presence since they secrete a ‘honeydew’. Black sooty bold may also in this sticky substance and while alarming looking does little to no damage since it does not penetrate the leaves. Aphids, however, do damage the plant. Spray leaves with a strong jet of water to dislodge most of them. Insecticidal soap is an organic approved product that provides pretty good control as long as the insects are wetted well. A second and third treatment to kill newly hatched eggs may be needed in 5-7 days.
  • Squash vine borer adults are 1 inch long, orange and green day-flying moths that are emerging from the soil now. They lay brown, button-shaped, 1/16 inch eggs at the base of the vines of summer and winter squashes. Examine stems daily and remove eggs by hand to prevent burrowing of larvae as they hatch. Wrap lower 6 –12 inches of stem with aluminum foil or floating row cover to prevent egg laying.
  • Mid to late June is an excellent time to take softwood cuttings of shrubs to start new plants. Some shrubs which can be propagated in this way are spirea, lilac and viburnum.
  • Stay out of the garden when the vegetable plant leaves are wet. Walking through a wet garden spreads disease from one plant to another.
  • After your vegetable garden is well established, it is best to water it thoroughly once a week rather than giving it a light watering every day. That way, a deeper root system is encouraged to develop, which will later help the plants tolerate dry weather.
  • Keep a close eye on the quality of your spring crops. Hot weather causes lettuce to bolt and become bitter. Plant a warm season crop as soon as the spring vegetables are harvested.
  • In most cases, blossom-end rot on tomatoes, peppers, squash and watermelons can be prevented. Do this by maintaining uniform soil moisture by mulching and watering correctly, planting in well drained soil and not cultivating deeper than one inch within one foot of the plant. Also avoid the use of high nitrogen fertilizers.
  • Continue planting direct-seeded, warm season vegetable crops such as beans, summer squash and cucumbers.

ZONE 6

  • Direct sow sunflowers, nasturtiums, marigolds, borage, basil, and other warm season flowers and herbs.
  • Continue monitoring for pest insects talked about in the May task list.
  • The beginning of June is an excellent time to take softwood cuttings of shrubs to start new plants. Some shrubs which can be propagated in this way are spirea, lilac and viburnum.
  • Stay out of the garden when the vegetable plant leaves are wet. Walking through a wet garden spreads disease from one plant to another.
  • After your vegetable garden is well established, it is best to water it thoroughly once a week rather than giving it a light watering every day. That way, a deeper root system is encouraged to develop, which will later help the plants tolerate dry weather.
  • Keep a close eye on the quality of your spring crops. Hot weather causes lettuce to bolt and become bitter. Plant a warm season crop as soon as the spring vegetables are harvested.
  • In most cases, blossom-end rot on tomatoes, peppers, squash, and watermelons can be prevented. Do this by maintaining uniform soil moisture by mulching and watering correctly, planting in well-drained soil and not cultivating deeper than one inch within one foot of the plant. Also avoid the use of high nitrogen fertilizers.
  • Have a trellis system in place for your tomato patch before the plants begin to sprawl.
  • Continue planting direct-seeded, warm season vegetable crops such as beans, summer squash and cucumbers.
  • Freshen up mulch around woody plants, perennials, and veggies if needed.
  • Garden flowers, whether annuals or perennials, benefit from "deadheading" after flowering. By removing the spent flower heads, energy is used to produce more flowers or foliage and roots. Many will produce another flush of blooms.
  • Weed the garden regularly to keep the task easy and manageable.
  • When asparagus and rhubarb reach the end of the harvest window, prepare to side-dress with a balanced fertilizer.
  • Plant buckwheat in vacant areas of the garden to prevent weeds.
  • Fertilize roses after their initial flush of flowers fade.

ZONE 7

  • Direct sow sunflowers, nasturtiums, marigolds, borage, basil, and other warm season flowers and herbs.
  • Continue monitoring for pest insects talked about in the May task list.
  • The beginning of June is an excellent time to take softwood cuttings of shrubs to start new plants. Some shrubs which can be propagated in this way are spirea, lilac and viburnum.
  • Stay out of the garden when the vegetable plant leaves are wet. Walking through a wet garden spreads disease from one plant to another.
  • After your vegetable garden is well established, it is best to water it thoroughly once a week rather than giving it a light watering every day. That way, a deeper root system is encouraged to develop, which will later help the plants tolerate dry weather.
  • Keep a close eye on the quality of your spring crops. Hot weather causes lettuce to bolt and become bitter. Plant a warm season crop as soon as the spring vegetables are harvested.
  • In most cases, blossom-end rot on tomatoes, peppers, squash, and watermelons can be prevented. Do this by maintaining uniform soil moisture by mulching and watering correctly, planting in well-drained soil and not cultivating deeper than one inch within one foot of the plant. Also avoid the use of high nitrogen fertilizers.
  • Continue planting direct-seeded, warm season vegetable crops such as beans, summer squash and cucumbers.
  • Freshen up mulch around woody plants, perennials, and veggies if needed.
  • Garden flowers, whether annuals or perennials, benefit from "deadheading" after flowering. By removing the spent flower heads, energy is used to produce more flowers or foliage and roots. Many will produce another flush of blooms.
  • Weed the garden regularly to keep the task easy and manageable.
  • When asparagus and rhubarb reach the end of the harvest window, prepare to side-dress with a balanced fertilizer.
  • Plant buckwheat in vacant areas of the garden to prevent weeds.
  • Fertilize roses after their initial flush of flowers fade.
  • There is still time to plant heat loving field peas, lima beans, and asparagus beans.
  • Pinch herbs like basil, mint, oregano, and savory to promote bushy growth.

ZONE 8

  • Direct sow sunflowers, nasturtiums, marigolds, borage, basil, and other warm season flowers and herbs.
  • Plant heat loving field peas, lima beans, and asparagus beans
  • Continue monitoring for pest insects talked about in the May task list.
  • Stay out of the garden when the vegetable plant leaves are wet. Walking through a wet garden spreads disease from one plant to another.
  • After your vegetable garden is well established, it is best to water it thoroughly once a week rather than giving it a light watering every day. That way, a deeper root system is encouraged to develop, which will later help the plants tolerate dry weather.
  • Keep a close eye on the quality of your spring crops. Hot weather causes lettuce to bolt and become bitter. Plant a warm season crop as soon as the spring vegetables are harvested.
  • In most cases, blossom-end rot on tomatoes, peppers, squash, and watermelons can be prevented. Do this by maintaining uniform soil moisture by mulching and watering correctly, planting in well-drained soil and not cultivating deeper than one inch within one foot of the plant. Also avoid the use of high nitrogen fertilizers.
  • Continue planting direct-seeded, warm season vegetable crops such as beans, summer squash and cucumbers.
  • Harvest vegetables such as beans, peas, squash, cucumbers and okra regularly to prolong production and enjoy peak freshness.
  • Control mosquitoes by eliminating all sources of stagnant water. Consider installing a bat house to encourage bat habitat, they eat mosquitoes!
  • Divide and transplant bearded iris using the vigorous ends of the rhizomes. Discard the old center portion. Cut the leaves back to about six inches.
  • Freshen up mulch around woody plants, perennials, and veggies if needed.
  • Garden flowers, whether annuals or perennials, benefit from "deadheading" after flowering. By removing the spent flower heads, energy is used to produce more flowers or foliage and roots. Many will produce another flush of blooms.
  • Weed the garden regularly to keep the task easy and manageable.
  • When asparagus and rhubarb reach the end of the harvest window, prepare to side-dress with a balanced fertilizer.
  • Plant buckwheat in vacant areas of the garden to prevent weeds.
  • Fertilize roses after their initial flush of flowers fade.
  • There is still time to plant heat loving field peas, lima beans, and asparagus beans.
  • Pinch herbs like basil, mint, oregano, and savory to promote bushy growth.

ZONE 9

  • Annuals that can take full sun during the increasingly hot summer months include celosia, portulaca, vinca, and some coleus.
  • Summer's warm, rainy months are the perfect time to plant palms. Make sure not to cover the trunk with soil.
  • Plant heat-loving herbs, including basil, Mexican tarragon, and rosemary. Pinch back regularly to prevent flowering and enhance branching.
  • Plant okra, southern pea, calabaza, Malabar spinach, and sweet potato. It is too late to plant tomatoes.
  • Monitor the landscape and garden weekly for harmful insects. Knowing which insects attack a plant can aid in identification and treatment.
  • Watch for drought stress and water as needed if rainfall has been spotty. Focus on new plantings and follow watering restrictions. When rains begin, shut down the irrigation system.
  • Produce more plants by air layering, grafting, division, or cuttings.
  • Lightly prune summer-flowering shrubs, like hibiscus, oleander, and crapemyrtle, during the warmer months because they bloom on new growth. Azaleas can still be pruned until the middle of next month without harming next spring's buds.
  • Some municipalities prohibit the application of fertilizer to lawns and/or landscape plants during the summer rainy season (June–September). See if such an ordinance exists in your area.
  • Clean up your vegetable garden and solarize the soil to kill pests and disease.

ZONE 10

  • Annuals that can take full sun during the increasingly hot summer months include celosia, portulaca, vinca, and some coleus.
  • Summer's warm, rainy months are the perfect time to plant palms. Make sure not to cover the trunk with soil.
  • Plant heat-loving herbs, including basil, ginger, summer savory, cumin, Mexican tarragon, and rosemary.
  • Plant tropical vegetables, such as boniato, calabaza, and chayote this month.
  • Monitor the landscape and garden weekly for harmful insects. Knowing which insects attack a plant can aid in identification and treatment.
  • Watch for drought stress and water as needed if rainfall has been spotty. Focus on new plantings and follow watering restrictions. When rains begin, shut down the irrigation system.
  • Produce more plants by air layering, grafting, division, or cuttings.
  • Lightly prune summer-flowering shrubs, like hibiscus, oleander, and ixora, during the warmer months to increase blooming.
  • Numerous municipalities prohibit the application of fertilizer to lawns and/or landscape plants during the summer rainy season (June–September). See if such an ordinance exists in your area.
  • Clean up your vegetable garden and solarize the soil for 4–6 weeks to kill pests and disease.