Garden Blog

How to Harvest & Preserve Your Herbs To Use All Year Round

How to Harvest & Preserve Your Herbs To Use All Year Round

As the gardening season comes to a close, nature calls us to put away as much as possible to eat over the cold winter. Pickles, tomato sauce, jams, and dried herbs for tea, medicine, and flavoring our foods are all easy and satisfying to accomplish. Here are a handful of useful tips you can use to keep your plants healthy, and get the best quality herbs to last you through the year.

Read more

Garden Blog

How to Grow Beets

How to Grow Beets

It seems with beets, folks either love them, or they- don’t love them. I’m of the opinion though that if you think you just don’t like them, then you just haven’t had them in the right preparation. Try fresh raw beets grated on your next salad. Slow roast some with garlic, thyme, and orange zest. (yum!) And don’t forget about those greens! Delicious! Easy to grow, incredibly nutritious, and will add beautiful color to your plate, beets have earned their place in your garden. Plant them!

Read more

Garden Blog

How to Grow Cabbage

How to Grow Cabbage

Cabbage deserves more credit! It’s incredibly high in vitamins A, C, and K, and has an impressive amount of calcium, potassium, and folate. The term “superfood” gets thrown around a lot, but in the case of cabbage with its mild flavors, versatility in recipes, and being so easy to grow, cabbage really is super!

Read more

Garden Blog

How to Grow Celery

How to Grow Celery

Celery has a very long maturing time, and can be finicky about soil nutrients, but growing your own celery is easy when given enough time and compost! Growing your own is also very economical. When harvesting just what you need from the outside of the plants, they can continue to grow all season long. Here's what you need to know!

Read more

Garden Blog

How to Grow Broccoli

How to Grow Broccoli

Homegrown broccoli is a tasty thing of beauty. With tender buds, stems that are firm and crisp, and leaves that can be sautéed up or thrown into smoothies, you can’t go wrong. Broccoli can even be grown as a winter crop in areas with mild winters, generally USDA zone 7 and above. In areas with long, cool springs or late fall freezes, you should choose varieties that are slow to mature. In other areas, choose the faster-maturing varieties.

Read more

12318